Friday, February 4, 2011

‘Early Will I Seek Thee’

by Dr. Woodrow Kroll


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O God, thou art my God; early will I seek thee: my soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee in a dry and thirsty land, where no water is (Ps. 63:1).

How amazing it is that finite creatures such as you and I may have fellowship with the infinite God. Yet this is our privilege as Christians; it is our right. But rights always bring responsibilities.

Psalm 63 is a gem of a psalm. The eloquent preacher of the fourth century, Chrysostom, testified: “It was decreed and ordained by the primitive fathers, that no day should pass without the public singing of this psalm.”

It is easy to see why the early Christians sang this song aloud at the beginning of every day. They would start their son, “O God, thou art my God.” This is easy to say, but difficult to live. To say that God is our God conveys a great deal of benefit. Because He is our God, all that He has is ours as well. We are heirs of God and join-heirs with Jesus Christ (Rom. 8:17). Ours is not an empty relationship with God but one filled with great blessing, great benefit, and great privilege.
But all of us who claim the Lord as our God don’t just receive special favors from Him; we return special services to Him. This is why in Psalm 118:28 David says, “Thou art my God, and I will praise thee: thou are my God, I will exalt thee.” Because He is our God and because we have special rights, it is incumbent upon us to exercise certain responsibilities. This David recognizes when he says, “O God, thou art my God: early will I seek thee” (PS. 63:1).

While as servants of God we may claim interest in Him, we also must exhibit our duty towards Him. Before all things, at the dawn of every day, before we seek anyone else, before we have our breakfast, “Early will I seek thee.”
There seems to be a direct relationship between seeking God in the morning and success throughout the day. Dr. Andrew Bonar once wrote in his dairy: “Tonight I gave myself to a time of waiting upon the Lord. I had not been much in the spirit of prayer, but now several things have become clear t me. I realize I have not communed enough with the Lord, nor come to Him as often as I should. Little forethought has been given to the requests I’ve made. There has been much conversing and outward engagement with men, but I have not been occupied enough with God Himself. I also realize that a closeness to Him gives abundant strength and is like sunlight shining through the clouds on a gloomy day.”
Bonar recognized that had he sought the Lord early, at the beginning of his day, and walked with Him consistently throughout the day, his evening time of waiting on the Lord in prayer would have been much more productive. The same is true for each of us.

Satisfaction for the soul cannot be found apart from fellowship with the Lord. David the psalmist sought to maintain his companionship with God from early morning until late at night. He made a practice of being in the “presence” of God throughout the day by the blessed privilege of prayer.
When our souls thirst for the Lord as our parched tongues thirst for water, when our appetite for righteousness equals our appetite for food, then we will make it a habit of rising early in the morning to make our first appointment of the day an appointment with God. He will be the first one on our minds in the morning and the last one on our mind at night. END

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